Drawings, Maps, and Artifacts of Japanese American Confinement Sites

The digital collection featured here includes three types of images relating to the War Relocation (WRA) Centers: 1) architectural drawings, 2) objects, and 3) engineering plans or maps made or related to the WRA Centers. These images are provided as a research resource of primary graphic documentation of the built environments of the WRA Centers for students, teachers, researchers, and the general public. To browse by WRA Center on the map, click on a red dot.
Please send inquiry requests to njahs@njahs.org.

Relocation Project Sites Location Map, 12/31/1942, Deptartment of War, Western Defense Command and Fourth Army, Wartime Civil Control Administration,
From the National Archives Records and Administration

During World War II, the United States government removed approximately 117,000 Japanese and Japanese Americans from the West Coast of the United States, Alaska and parts of Arizona, under the authorization of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Presidential Executive Order 9066 (E.O. 9066) on February 19, 1942. The United States government first imprisoned Japanese and Japanese Americans living on the West Coast, in Alaska and in parts of Arizona in "Assembly" Centers. By October of 1942, the U.S. government had moved 110,000 people to ten semi-permanent new cities that the government named War Relocation Authority (WRA) “relocation centers,” as shown in red on the map above. The WRA Centers represent ten of the sites that collectively are known as Japanese American confinement sites.

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Ink drawing on paper. 'We left it up to the transportation department to solve our gas and rubber shortage.' 3 Africans hauling away a man on stretcher and U.S mail sack. Two American men having a conversation. 3 barracks in the background. Ezerase Bond Efficiency watermark. 1 page. Paper, ink. [...]
Mon, Jun 06, 2016, Continue reading at the source
Ink drawing on paper. '--- and Miss Mac Gillvray is of the Indian Service.' Three people in image. Person at desk, Miss Mac Gillvray in Native American clothing, and person on the left with a look of confusion. In an office space. 1 page. Paper, ink. [...]
Mon, Jun 06, 2016, Continue reading at the source
Misunderstanding in the Art Department. Text, 'I'm afraid Kido didn't quite convey the idea that Miss Jean wanted.' George Kido painting an image of a baby with horns and a mustache. Painting says, 'KEEP BABIES' 'WELL.' Figure standing in a suit with hands on hips. Location in the art department. [...]
Mon, Jun 06, 2016, Continue reading at the source
Ink drawing on paper. 'I'm afraid there's been a slight mix-up at the procurement office!' Poston Hospital. First person leaning against a tank talking to the woman at hospital entrance. Tank has a banner that says, 'Consigned for hospital use.' Sketched with pencil. 1 page. Paper, ink. [...]
Mon, Jun 06, 2016, Continue reading at the source
Comic ink drawing. 'Let's go! This is where we came in.' Projection on a screen: desert landscape with cactus railroad, tracks and mountains.' Figures of people's heads facing the screen. Outdoor nighttime. Ezerase Bond Efficiency. 1 page. Paper, ink. [...]
Mon, Jun 06, 2016, Continue reading at the source
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This project is sponsored by the National Japanese American Historical Society.